From the Blog of Pure Wellness

Stress Posts

Herbalism Education: Herbs in Massage

Did you know you can add food into the mix without being messy?
Did you know you can make massage oils without buying expensive essential oils?

Making your own herbal infused massage oil is actually very easy! You only need 3 supplies and a good 6 weeks to make it happen.
Read below to see which type of massage oil you would like to make.

Pick an herb
Lavender – relaxing
Chamomile – relaxing
Comfrey – soothing
Ginger – warming
Calendula – hydrating
Rosemary – muscle rub
or pick an herb to experiment with. There are SO many!
Pick a carrier oil
Almond Oil
Grapeseed Oil
Olive Oil
Jojoba Oil
or pick another carrier oil that you love.
Mason Jar with Lid

Directions: You can use dried or fresh herbs (make sure you leave no space for any bacteria to grow if you are using fresh). Fill the jar with chopped herb, cover completely with your carrier oil, cap the jar tight and set in a sunny area in the house. You will notice infusion with some herbs with the oil changes color (depending on the herb) or just wait 6 weeks until it’s ready. Strain the oil through cheesecloth and bottle your lovely, new herbal massage oil and keep it in a dark, cool cabinet when not in use.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Herbalism Education: Lemon Balm

Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis)

Essential Oil: Steam distilled

Uses: antiviral, nervine, sedative, carminative, mild antidepressant. Fresh or dried leaves and flowers can be used in essential oils, teas, tinctures, and infused oils.

Quick Tip: For a little burst of sunshine in the winter months, infuse an ounce of lemon balm in a quart of boiling water, cap it tightly, and leave it overnight. Strain and drink the next couple days (refrigerate).

Herb of the week is to give you a brief overview of the many plants that grace our Earth. Please research further into herbs before using these on yourself and loved ones. Especially if you are pregnant.

Herbalism Education: Motherwort

Motherwort, Leonurus cardiac

Uses: Nervine, diuretic, antispasmodic, emmenagogue, uterine tonic.  Fresh or dried Motherwort can be used in teas, tinctures, poultice and infused oils.

Quick Tip: For menstrual related nerves and emotions, mix 1-2 teaspoons of motherwort in a cup of boiling water and steep for 5-10 minutes. Add spearmint or peppermint for a more pleasant taste.

Herb of the week is to give you a brief overview of the many plants that grace our Earth. Please research further into herbs before using these on yourself and loved ones. Especially if you are pregnant.

Herbalism Education: Lavender

Lavender, Lavandula angustifolia

Essential Oil: Steam Distilled

Uses: antiseptic, nervine, stomachic, anti-inflammatory, calming, mild sedatitive.  Fresh or dried Lavender can be used in teas, tinctures, liniments and infused oils.  The essential oil can be used in lotions, salves, oils, bath soaks, sprays or diffusers and sometimes neat (please use caution and test before using it undiluted)

Quick Tip: Make a sleep sachet by filling a muslin bag with dry or fresh lavender to hang by your bed. Rub the flowers to release any essential oils again.

Herb of the week is to give you a brief overview of the many plants that grace our Earth. Please research further into herbs before using these on yourself and loved ones.

Herbalism Education: Peppermint

Peppermint, Mentha Piperita

Essential Oil: Steam Distilled

Uses: anti-emetic, antispasmodic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory.  Fresh or dried Peppermint can be used in teas, tinctures, liniments and infused oils.  The essential oil can be used in lotions, salves, oils, bath soaks, or diffusers.

Quick Tip: Add a cup of fresh pulverized (or 1/2 cup dried) Peppermint into your tub water for an aromatic bath to clear your head. If you don’t prefer herbs floating around you, put them in a sock or hose and hang from faucet under running hot water.

Herb of the week is to give you a brief overview of the many plants that grace our Earth. Please research further into herbs before using these on yourself and loved ones.

Aromatherapy Education: Ylang Ylang

Ylang Ylang (Cananga odorata) is sometimes distilled in fractions from the blossoms commonly originating in Madagascar. It is called the “flowers of flowers” and carries a sweet, slightly exotic aroma that is used in many perfumes. Benefits may include:

  • uplifting for the blues
  • relaxant
  • calms and releases tension
  • balances skin sebum production
  • hypertension

Ylang Ylang blends best with other florals as well as citruses and woodsy aromas.

Aromatherapy Education: Palma Rosa

Palma Rosa (Cymbopogon martinii) is a grass usually native to India and steam-distilled. It has a floral aroma of roses and geranium. Benefits of Palma Rosa:

  • insect repellant
  • anti-fungal
  • sebum balancer
  • stress relief when inhaled

It is best blended with Rose, Geranium, Lavender, and citruses and woody aromas.

Aromatherapy Education: Sweet Orange

Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis) is cold pressed by the peel and mostly originating in the USA. The Sweet Orange is the same orange most people find themselves eating and squeezing into their daily meals. It has a sweet, citrusy uplifting aroma and even a few benefits:

  • Freshens stale air and uplifts emotions
  • low immune system
  • helpful in respiratory health
  • brightens dull skin

Sweet Orange blends best with Geranium, Lavender, other citruses, wood and spice aromas.

Aromatherapy Education: Patchouli

Patchouli (Pogostemon patchouli or Pogostemon cablin) are grasses that are steam distilled  mostly originating in Sumatra or India. Besides its aroma use in the 60’s, it has a few health benefits as well:

  • soothes inflamed skin or eczema
  • tones skin
  • known to be a sedative when blended with other sedatives
  • known to also be a stimulant when using large quantities
  • aphrodisiac

Blends well with Bergamot, Cedarwood, Lavender, Myrrh, Rose

Aromatherapy Education: Juniper

Juniper (Juniperus communis) is steam distilled from the branches and berries of the Juniper. It has a crisp, woody, almost fruity aroma. The benefits are as follows:

  • diuretic properties
  • helps in aiding respiratory system
  • helpful in aches and pains
  • centering and balancing for emotions

It is best blended with Cypress, Fennel, Rosemary, and Lemon.